Tricia Drammeh – Reading Recommendation Revisited

Tricia Drammeh was first featured on Reading Recommendations in Oct. 2014, then a second time in Apr. 2015. Tricia maintains a terrific promotional blog, Authors To Watch, where she has not only featured me and my writing a number of times, but also regularly reblogs other author promotions I’ve posted to Reading Recommendations. She writes informative and interesting blogposts dealing with issues of interest to all authors on subjects such as writing, promotion, using social media, and self-publishing. I’ve long considered her to be one of my favourite bloggers, and so since we first connected I have been consulting with Tricia offline on various ideas and thoughts we’ve both had about this business. We’ve even collaborated on more than a few blog posts, seeking each others’ counsel, editing, and advice while writing. Tricia Drammeh is an extremely supportive fellow writer! Plus I also consider her to be a fine writer as well, and have thoroughly enjoyed her novels I’ve read, even included them on my Best Books Read in 2015 list. I’m pleased now to “induct” Tricia into this RRR feature of the blog, as she truly embodies all the reasons why promote my fellow authors – she really does “get” it. Welcome, Tricia Drammeh!

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RRR: Since your first promotion on RR, what have you been doing?
TD: Since my first promotion on Reading Recommendations, I’ve published two books. Sweet Sorrow is a teen drama/romance. The Warrior is a prequel to the Spellbringers Series. I’ve also had two short stories published in anthologies. Change of Heart appears in Alternate Voices, an anthology which features characters from Juliet B. Madison’s DI Lyle Mystery Series. Midnight Summons is a short story that appears in the Ink Slingers’ League’s Halloween Anthology. Right now, I’m working on a couple of different novels and trying to keep up with blogging. My personal blog hasn’t been as active as I’d like, but my promotional blog, Authors to Watch, is still active.

One of the things I’m most excited about is that I finally found a local writers group here in New Hampshire. It’s a great mix of writers, from novelists to playwrights to journalists.

RRR: What else have you been doing, outside of the writing?
TD: I recently started a new job. I’m still with the same company, but no longer in the same department. After working in accounting for so many years, it’s been a challenge having to learn something new.

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RRR: Is there one marketing tip or trick you discovered while promoting your own books that worked particularly well and that you’d like to share with other authors?
TD: To be honest, I don’t do a lot of promotion because I think readers are so inundated with “buy my book” messages, they begin to tune it out. Instead of promoting my own work, I like to promote books I’ve enjoyed reading. When authors skip the “buy my book” pleas and instead focus on truly connecting with readers, it builds relationships. We connect with readers by sharing book recommendations, posting informative articles, or offering insight into our lives by blogging or posting on Facebook. Of course, it’s fine to share our books when we publish something new or receive a fantastic review, but nonstop Tweets with book links get tiresome after a while.

RRR: Please recommend three other authors whose work you have “discovered” or rediscovered this past year whom every reader should consider reading.
TD: I recently finished reading Finding Charlie which is the third book by Katie O’Rourke. I believe her work is classified as women’s fiction, but it’s something everyone can enjoy. If you enjoy realistic, slice-of-life stories, you should definitely check out her work.

Another excellent book I’d like to mention is Darkhaven by AFE Smith. Darkhaven is the first in a fantasy series. The pacing is great with beautifully, descriptive writing. The second book in the series was recently released, and I’m looking forward to reading it.

An author I rediscovered is Bette A. Stevens. She is the author of Amazing Matilda, a children’s book about a determined butterfly. She also writes thought-provoking historical fiction. I read Pure Trash a couple of years ago and the story was so powerful, it stayed on my mind. I recently reread it and I’ll probably read it again. It’s a story that explores poverty, class differences, and bullying. I highly recommend it.

Thank you, Tricia!

Seumas Gallacher – Reading Recommendation Revisited

Seumas Gallacher was first featured on Reading Recommendations in April 2014, and has been a true friend to the site … and to me!, ever since! Seumas not only reblogs his fellow authors’ promotions, but reads and reviews their books, has invited them to write guest blog posts, and has been a great pal to all of us ever since we first “met” online. I’m very pleased now to present Seumas Gallacher to you again on Reading Recommendations Revisited, because I have since read all his books and consider him to be a top-notch author who has the keen ability to tell a gripping tale. I highly recommend everything Seumas has written. Besides all that, he wears a kilt!

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RRR: Since your first promotion on RR, what have you been doing?
SG: The fourth Jack Calder crime thriller, Killer City, was launched a couple of months ago, and its place in the Work-In-Progress slot has been taken over by the fifth in the series, Deadly Impasse. IMG_0954 copy 2

However, since last time m’Lady Susan allowed me space on her Reading Recommendations pages, the most significant development for my writing has been the arrival of the partnership with a publisher . . . yes, gasp!, a real live publishing house. The excellent partnership of Laurence and Stephanie Patterson of Crooked Cat Publishing, based in Edinburgh, have taken my work aboard. All previous three self-published titles have been re-launched under their imprint. Among several positive additions they bring to my scribbling efforts is the assignment of a professional editor, the superb, eagle-eyed Maureen Vincent-Northam.

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RRR: What else have you been doing, outside of the writing?
SG: I suppose, the achievement of continued breathing is always to be applauded and welcomed. Apart from that, continued association with a marvelous band of kindred writing spirits in the Bahrain Writers Circle has been a source of great sharing pleasure.

Continued regular travel between Bahrain and Abu Dhabi in pursuit of my ‘day job’ of running my Management Advisory Services business adds more colour to my months.

RRR: Is there one marketing tip or trick you discovered while promoting your own books that worked particularly well and that you’d like to share with other authors?
SG: Not so much a tip or trick, more a truism for me is the constant attention to the social network activity which I highly recommend to the modern scribe – being ‘present’ in an engaged manner with the various constituents, such as readers, other writers, editors, and the publishing world at large.

RRR: Please recommend three other authors whose work you have “discovered” or rediscovered this past year whom every reader should consider reading.
SG: As part of my ‘paying it back’ and ‘paying it forward’ I regularly download books from other authors, particularly newbies, and if their content warrants a four-star or five-star-rated review, I publish those on Amazon . . . lower ratings than that, I do not publicly announce these, as I do not feel I have the right to diminish the efforts of any author, and rather would attempt to contact them directly with my opinion and an offer of suggestions for improvements. In the course of doing all of this, I encounter some excellent work. Among these, I highly recommend:

Carol Hedges—her Victorian crime novels are a delight to read. A mixture of dark deeds in the fog-swirled street of London with an uncanny wit make her a must-read author.

Alex Shaw—his insights on the background of the Ukrainian/Russian political intrigues are married cleverly with special agents’ involvement.

Ailsa Abraham—not my usual reading genre, but I was captivated from the start by the mystical nuances of Black Shamans and warrior monks in the yin and yang of seemingly opposing, mystical, spiritual and ‘religious’ provenances.

Thank you, Seumas!