Kevin Brennan

Author small photo Kevin Brennan

What is your latest release and what genre is it? Yesterday Road (literary fiction/humor)

Quick description: In this “coming-of-old-age” tale, Jack Peckham finds himself on a journey into his distant past, helped along the way by Joe Easterday, a young man with Down syndrome, and Ida Pevely, a middle-aged waitress with her own mountain of regrets. Jack has a hundred grand in cash that he can’t explain, since he can’t remember yesterday much less forty years ago. Setting out from Northern California for “points east,” he gets lost, carjacked, abandoned, and arrested, but he’s always homing in on the one object of his inner drive — home. With humor and plenty of unexpected turns, Kevin Brennan’s second novel is a lyrical and poignant story of memory and identity, of how it is the whole of experience — pain and regret along with love and pleasure — that gives life its fullness. We all tow our histories behind us as we make our way down Yesterday Road.

Small cover

Brief biography:
Kevin Brennan, author of Parts Unknown (William Morrow) has rung in the new year in Red Square, performed as a busker in the London Underground, wandered the California desert, and auditioned unsuccessfully for a chance at stardom on reality television. He and his wife live in Northern California.

Links to buy Kevin’s book:
Amazon Worldwide – eBook
Barnes & Noble – eBook
iTunes – eBook
Kobo – eBook
Smashwords – eBook

Kevin’s promo links:
Blog
Facebook
Twitter
email: kevinbrennan520 (at) gmail.com
Goodreads
Amazon author page

What are you working on now?
I’ll be publishing a new novel later in 2014, called Occasional Soulmates. It’s a bit of a departure for me, really — a literary/chick-lit story in the first person. But it’s more meta chick-lit, since my protagonist seems to be aware that she’s in her own relationship novel. Kevin did indeed publish this new novel and the update was featured here on Reading Recommendations.

Kevin’s reading recommendation:
I just finished reading The Good Son, a 1982 novel by Craig Nova. It utterly blew me away. Nova uses a number of first-person voices to examine a complicated father/son relationship in the ‘40s and ’50s, each voice carrying the character’s own slant and motives so that a fascinating mosaic emerges. I hadn’t heard of Nova until recently, but he’s been around a long time and deserves much more recognition.